WD 40 is a degreaser


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Hello!
So far I only knew oil, grease, etc., so things that lubricate and clean, so I used chain cleaner or degreaser to degrease.
The can WD40 now says that it dissolves grease, but you should still be able to use it for lubricating.

Exact composition unknown (http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/WD-40).

Hello!
So far I only knew oil, grease, etc., things that lubricate and clean, so I used chain cleaner or degreaser to degrease.
The can WD40 now says that it dissolves grease, but you should still be able to use it for lubricating.

WD 40 is a short-term lubricant and cleaning agent.


Brunox is better.



better is pure spray oil, without solvents like this:
http://www.caramba.de/var/plain/storage/images/produkte/produktlinien/profi_line/multioele_rostloeser/nass_spruehoel_c27/1651-11-ger-DE/nass_spruehoel_c27.jpg

Aha.

Yes

Find it more pleasant to work with it, although it stinks more.


Worked with WD 40 for years until 2004, since then with Brunox.


Nevertheless, Brunox remains more of a cleaning agent than a lubricant. However, the lubricating effect lasts a little longer than with WD 40.

So they both stink badly, I think.
Got both of them standing around.
Usually I also prefer Brunox, but mainly because it is easier to dose. WD-40 cannot be dosed precisely with the can, you always sauté everything with it. Brunox can also be given a minimal amount of work.
In terms of the effect, I haven't noticed any noticeable differences so far ...

WD 40 is my miracle cure for everything that squeaks. If you don't like the smell, take Balistol, it smells of spruce, then you will always have a feeling of closeness to nature near your bike :-P

Greetings Hifly

WD 40 is my miracle cure for everything that squeaks. If you don't like the smell, take Balistol, it smells of spruce, then you will always have a feeling of closeness to nature near your bike :-P

Greetings Hifly

Pooh

Balistol stinks badly




Then prefer Brunox.

But my question is still not answered correctly.
How can something remove and clean oil, but still lubricate.
On MTB I also use the cleaner for the disc brakes, would WD40 work there too?

But my question is still not answered correctly.
How can something remove and clean oil, but still lubricate.
On the MTB, I also use the cleaner for the disc brakes, would WD40 also work there?

"Creeping oil is a thin fluid oil with low surface tension and water-displacing properties. These make it possible to penetrate into the finest cracks, through the capillary action also against gravity, and to infiltrate dirt, oxides and moisture in the process."

Aha, so it creeps under the other oil or fat. Sounds logical.
But then it's still greased afterwards, isn't it?
Or does it evaporate so quickly that at some point there is nothing left?
I always had the cleaners as something similar to e.g. rinsing, which also dissolves fat.
That's why I have my concerns, e.g. clean the braking surface with penetrating oil.
Maybe I'm just too stupid, but I just can't imagine it very well.

Without scientific claim:

Like Brunox, WD-40 is a cleaning agent with a residual lubricating effect. For a short time after use, a lubricating film of somewhat longer-chain hydrocarbons remains, which, however, dissolves relatively quickly.

Classic example: Squeaky derailleur rollers - the lubricant as a rule has regularly treated his chain with WD-40 / Brunox or similar. At some point this flushes the fat out of the roller bearings.

The stuff is okay for cleaning, but that's about it.

I think Brunox is better than WD-40;), Cleans equally well, but is a bit smudgy ...

G.

OK. So this is not something to lubricate your chain with.
I always use Brunox for the fork on MTB.
And what is the difference between a cleaning agent like WD40 or Brunox and a chain cleaner or degreaser?
So WD40 is mainly good for e.g. remove hardened oil residues?

To answer the actual question for a change:


a glance at the composition information included in the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) for WD-40 aerosol indicates the product is primarily petroleum-based, with the main ingredient being "solvent naptha, petroleum, medium aliphatic" (also known as Stoddard Solvent ):

solvent naphtha petroleum, medium aliphatic,> 60%
petroleum base oil as paraffinic distillate, heavy, solvent-dewaxed (severe), 15% to 25%
corrosion inhibitor unregulated, 1% to 10%
wetting agent unregulated, 1% to 10%
fragrance unregulated, 0% to 1%
carbon dioxide, 2% to 3%
Last updated: 2nd January 2007

The URL for this page is http://www.snopes.com/inboxer/household/wd-40.asp

So at least 60% solvent, 15-25% oil.

When it comes to pure lubrication, I would also use the pure spray oil called by Kolo.

there are fat-soluble and water-soluble.

Liquid fats are called oils. The less viscous, the more dissolving power. WD 40 is very fluid, as fluid as diesel oil. Not quite as liquid as gasoline. Petrol hardly smears any more, car grease a lot. Car grease is already a grease and therefore dissolves poorly. If you make the car grease hot and it melts, it is car oil.: D You can remove a lot of grease stains with car oil. Etc.

WD40 is a mineral oil product. So it comes from the refinery. A refinery is such a high tower where crude oil comes in. At the top then floats the light liquid like gasoline and kerosene, at the bottom heavy fat and muddy thick oil collects. The mineral oil companies siphon off this and make difficult, expensive money with it. A jar of WD 40 costs 3 euros. In Saudi Arabia you get a keg of crude oil for it, which you can then use to make expensive gasoline.

But the state deserves the most.

(Stored like this in my head: ü)

um WD40 is great. But Ballistol is better. Somehow made from the forest and theoretically you can even eat it. So environmentally friendly. Also good for the chain and expensive kitchen knives too. I just bought 1 liter of spray ballistol: blues bread

WD40 is a mineral oil product. So it comes from the refinery. A refinery is such a high tower where crude oil comes in. At the top then floats the light liquid like gasoline and kerosene, at the bottom heavy fat and muddy thick oil collects. The mineral oil companies skim it off and earn money with it, which is difficult and expensive. A jar of WD 40 costs 3 euros. In Saudi Arabia you get a keg of crude oil for it, which you can then use to make expensive gasoline.

Exactly! Here is an employee of the refinery how he turns crude oil into gasoline and kerosene:

http://img.slate.com/media/1/123125/123019/2111919/2123763/050824_PB_Crack_ex.jpg

:Fishing rod:

My mustard to the poss. Application:

To clean the WD40 chain, spray it into the cloth and then let the chain run through - it works fantastic! Of course, let it run through a dry cloth again afterwards.

Also useful for stiff Bowden cables, as the WD40 has a high "creep ability"! The disadvantage, of course, is the fact that something can always "go wrong".

To be on the safe side, I wouldn't use it to clean the disc brakes, because it also contains oil. Certainly great cleaning, but if in the end there is oil ... But let me teach you better.

Conclusion:
Cleaning agent for everything that is lubricated anyway or for places that are difficult to reach

But since the question was also asked about the area of ​​application of the WD 40:
- loosen stuck connections (penetrating oil)
- Corrosion protection (also on electronic components because it does not conduct (e.g. for the switches on the handlebars of the motorcycle)

I mainly use it on my bike for:
- rear derailleur and front derailleur
- Cleaning the sprocket set (in my opinion there is nothing better!)
- Rub the chain (only a little on a cloth, otherwise the grease in the rollers will be removed) and oil again afterwards.

rather not use:
- As a chain lubricant (even if some do)
- on brake surfaces and brake discs (unless you want to shut down the brake anyway ...: rolleyes :). Afterwards I always degrease the brake parts with brake cleaner or similar, e.g. when I have cleaned the sprocket set with WD 40, because something is always dripping on the rim!

P.S .: By the way, I think it smells SUPER ...: D

um WD40 is great. But Ballistol is better. Somehow made from the forest and theoretically you can even eat it. So environmentally friendly. Also good for the chain and expensive kitchen knives too. I just bought 1 liter of spray ballistol: blues bread

Not to be forgotten: Suitable for wound disinfection if the chain was well lubricated but badly riveted: Applause:

Not to be forgotten: Suitable for wound disinfection if the chain was well lubricated but badly riveted: Applause:

That only applies to gunshot wounds, you joker: D

I can see you're the second nod from Beat B.: Applause:

P.S .: By the way, I think it smells SUPER ...: D

DITO: Applause:

... this is how the vile stay in the cellar becomes a culinary experience: rolling:

Ah, now the light is dawning on me.
@Skau: Thank you for the explanation.
Did I understand correctly that a pure braking or chain cleaner only contains solvents?
And what exactly is the difference between water-soluble and fat-soluble?
Then what is e.g. in the sink? So you can also solve in bold.

Incidentally, I already noticed the good smell at the Brunox.
Also called deodorant for the suspension fork.

Did I understand correctly that a pure brake or chain cleaner only contains solvents?

That's why the WD 40 has lost nothing of its brakes.

Then what is e.g. in the sink? So you can also solve in bold.

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tenside

http://www.quarks.de/schmutz/0302.htm

If you put WD40 on the brake discs you can usually forget the pads, Magura and co have organic pads that suck up and no longer work, Hayes once had something on the downhill where something dripped on, never braked again before the pads were changed.

So stay away from the brakes or rims

By the way, brake cleaner is not just called that, you can also clean disc brakes with great ease ;-)

Thanks, now I have a good overview and first of all know.

@Topic again

Like Ballistol, WD40 is actually a cleaning and protective oil.

Who "served" (: D) knows what I mean. You can clean very well with the stuff and, if there are no weather or mechanical influences, it forms a perfect and well-spreading protection.

I used to use Ballistol as a permanent lubrication for the chain, but have since switched to Finish Line Cross Country.

Currently I only use WD40 or Ballistol to clean parts. I recently had a messy XT rear derailleur and the associated shift / brake units. Dismantled parts in an old saucepan, sprayed Ballistol properly on it, druffed the lid and let it work for a few days. Then wipe everything off and you're done! Also works wonderfully with the chain.

I have "served" as well, but since I am also a marksman, my experiences with Balistol and WD 40 are mainly because of this. Both means are good for cleaning and also lubricate. Balistol is also used to impregnate the wooden stock of the rifle and to care for the leather. But like all universal remedies, these can do a lot, but nothing particularly well. There are better means for cleaning only and better means for lubrication only.

Here you can find the safety data sheet for WD-40 with all the details.
http://www.wd40.com/Brands/pdfs/msds-wd40_aerosol.gr.pdf

Personally, however, I prefer Brunox.
I imagine that Brunox's lubrication capabilities are better than WD-40's.
WD-40 is good at making stuck things work. IMHO Brunox is better suited for regular maintenance.

The Ballistol already mentioned here should be used with caution. It forms a jelly-like goo that can prevent fine components from moving. It should therefore not be used for gear levers. But it also helps with insect bites and is absolutely non-toxic.

The Ballistol already mentioned here should be used with caution. It forms a jelly-like goo

: crabs:

What do you have to do with Ballistol to make it "glib"? : confused:

In any case, the experience has passed me by so far.

: crabs:

What do you have to do with Ballistol to make it "glib"? : confused:

In any case, the experience has passed me by so far.

Let a few drops air dry for a few days. It thickens and becomes jelly-like. Although it can be spread easily again, it has clearly lost its viscosity. With fine components (e.g. the small springs in an STI) it can happen that these "stick together" and only work hesitantly.
Nothing against Ballistol - it's great stuff, but I'd rather use it for bigger parts. It was originally a gun oil, so it was designed for "hand-operated" solid mechanics.

I made this experience on the job, where we once lubricated the brass gears of several micromotors with Ballistol on a trial basis. At first they ran wonderfully, but after a few days (and especially after a long period of idle time) the torque of the first gear stage was no longer sufficient to overcome the gelatinization.
In the end, the gears had to be blown out with compressed air. We have been using silicone oil for it ever since.

where do you get the wd-40?

With the WD40, I have already ruined 2 or 3 sets of brake pads on my disc brakes through careless use ... meanwhile when cleaning the bike I have switched to covering the brake calipers with disposable gloves when 'misting' with cleaning oils, so to speak as a contraceptive: D

I don't think the smell is bad ... but my wife loves it. But she also greedily smells the smell of good super gasoline at the gas station, while it immediately gives me a headache. Well, as long as I don't catch her sniffing .......;): ü: D

Regards Jörg

I don't think the smell is bad ... but my wife loves it. But she also greedily smells the smell of good super gasoline at the gas station, while it immediately gives me a headache.

Then give her a bottle of Ballistol for Christmas, which I also think is the most delicious of the three mentioned. Slightly sweeter than Brunox, more of a fragrance for winter.

where do you get the wd-40?

You can actually get this in every construction / home improvement store.
And sometimes also at Lidl.

Where can you get the wd-40 from Almost everywhere in bike shops, motorcycle accessories, car accessories, hardware stores, general stores, supermarkets. We used to have a saying for it: "You get thrown if you don't close the door properly";)

Oh yes, also with you (like with Tyler): Welcome back. Nothing read for a long time;)

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